2016/17 Police precept

Council tax 2016/17

North Yorkshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner is responsible for setting the local police ‘precept’ – the amount people pay through their council tax for policing.

Some 55 per cent of North Yorkshire Police’s funding comes from the Government. But the remaining 45 per cent is raised locally and is paid for by residents through their council tax.

Your contribution through your council tax 2016/17

Property Band 2015/16 2016/17 Increase per year Increase per week
A  £   141.85  £  144.67  £         2.82 5 pence
B  £   165.49  £  168.78  £         3.29 6 pence
C  £   189.13  £  192.89  £         3.76 7 pence
D  £   212.77  £  217.00  £         4.23 8 pence
E  £   260.05  £  265.22  £         5.17 10 pence
F £   307.33  £  313.44  £         6.11 12 pence
G  £   354.62  £  361.67  £         7.05 14 pence
H  £   425.54  £  434.00  £         8.46 16 pence

Income available to the Police and Crime Commissioner

Income available to the PCC 2015-16 £m 2016-17 £m
Government Grant 69.1 68.7
Council Tax Grants 7.9 7.9
Council Tax Requirement – your contribution 60.8 63.6
Total 137.8 140.2
Other Income  – Specific Grants 3.0 2.9
Other Income  – Fees, Charges and Partnerships 6.2 7.0
Reserves Movements -0.2 3.2
Total Funding Available  146.8 153.2

 How the money is spent

The Funding is spent on the following: 2015-16 £m 2016-17 £m
Office of the PCC 0.9 0.9
Corporate Services 24.8 26.6
Capital Financing 2.2 4.3
Expenditure by the Police Force:
Employees 103.4 104.7
Supplies and Services 8.9 10.4
Injury and Medical Pensions 3.2 3.2
Transport 2.3 2.2
Other Costs 1.0 1.0
Budget allocated to the Police Force 118.8 121.4
Gross Expenditure 146.8 153.2

Precept - how the money is spent 2016-17

2016/17 Police precept consultation

North Yorkshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Julia Mulligan, is responsible for setting the local police ‘precept’ – the amount people pay through their council tax for policing.

She conducted the consultation and says its results will help guide her decision.

More than 1,750 people responded to the consultation which included an independent telephone survey of North Yorkshire residents and an online survey.  The combined results showed 66 per cent of respondents wanted to increase the precept – either by 1.99 per cent or more.

“This is a crucial decision which will not only determine how much people have to pay for the police in their council tax but also the level of policing they can expect for years to come,” said Julia.

“Their views will influence greatly a decision that will affect every single person in North Yorkshire.”

In the consultation, residents were asked if they wanted to:

  • Freeze the precept – meaning no more to pay locally, but harder for the police to deliver services and balance the books
  • Increase it by 1.99 per cent – in order to raise just over £1.2 million for next year and subsequent years, but avoid a costly local referendum, or
  • Increase it by more than two per cent – which could raise more money, but would mean at least £700,000 would need to be spent on a referendum on the proposals.

precept-results-pie-e1452775819519Overall, the results show:

  • 61 per cent of respondents want to increase the precept by 1.99 per cent
  • five per cent want to increase it by more than two per cent, and
  • 34 per cent want to freeze the precept.

Some 55 per cent of North Yorkshire Police’s funding comes from the Government.  But the remaining 45 per cent is raised locally and is paid for by residents through their council tax. It is this local funding that Julia sought people’s views on.

She said:  “North Yorkshire is the safest place in England and our police do a good job. But like everywhere, we have our challenges.

“The government has assumed a precept rise of 1.99 per cent in all their calculations, which means freezing the precept would lead, in effect, to a cash-cut of £1.2million and make it harder to  deliver the services people want.”

The consultation comprised an independent telephone survey of North Yorkshire residents. It also included an online survey promoted via social media and the press and a leaflet survey which respondents could complete and return FREEPOST. Residents could also email their views to the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner.

The breakdown of responses was:

  • Online survey – 1,337 respondents
  • Telephone survey – 403 respondents
  • Email, telephone, leaflet return, street interviews – 12 respondents
  • TOTAL respondents – 1,752

Results of the telephone survey:

  • 73 per cent wanted to increase the precept by 1.99 per cent
  • Seven per cent wanted to increase the precept by more than two per cent
  • 20 per cent wanted to freeze the precept.

Results of the online survey:

  • 57 per cent wanted to increase the precept by 1.99 per cent
  • Five per cent wanted to increase the precept by more than two per cent
  • 38 per cent wanted to freeze the precept.